Carolyn Porter | Handwriting
Learn more about the book "Marcel's Letters" and the font P22 Marcel Script, which is based on the handwriting of conscripted WWII laborer Marcel Heuzé
Carolyn Porter, Marcel Heuzé, Marcel's Letters, Handwritten Letters, World War II, P22 Marcel, Typography, Love Story, Reunion, Daimler, Berlin, Marienfelde, STO, Forced Labor, Service du Travail Obligatoire, WWII
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  • Binder with class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Label on front of binder says "Drawing and Painting notebook."
  • handwritten nameplate on class notebook: reads "Charlotte Cummings, Drawing & Painting, Notebook"
  • Binder with notes from Drawing and Painting classes, made by Charlotte R. Cummings in 1921/1922 while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Binder with typed class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Top of page reads, "Class Notes, Sept. 27, 1921: Pigments and Materials"
  • Binder with typed class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. At top of page read the words "Oct. 4, 1921 Technical Notes on Painting."
  • Binder with typed class notes; made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Top of page says "Jan. 10, 1922, Class Notes, Question of Painting:"
  • Binder with typed class notes; made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Top of page says "5/11/22 Landscape Painting: Sir Alfred East. Chap. III. Sketching from Nature"
  • Binder with handwritten class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Notes were made during painting classes/lectures.
  • Binder with typed class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Top of page reads, "Chap III - Color Mixture and Balance."
  • Binder with typed class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Page outlines types of paint brushes, assigns Class A, B, C, or D, and explains what each class of brushes is ideal for.
  • Binder with typed class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Page includes recipes to mix paint colors.
  • Binder with typed and handwritten class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Left-hand page was written in shorthand, the right-hand pages shows the beginning of a section on "Drawing and Painting, Second semester."
  • Handwritten class notes from September 22, 1922. Top of page reads "Art Structure" and "Lecture 1"
  • Binder with handwritten class notes from Drawing and Painting classes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Binder with handwritten class notes from Drawing and Painting classes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Binder with rectangles of green watery paint swatches; made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
  • Binder with black chalk sketch of young boy sitting on stool; made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Binder with class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Interior page showing color study using blues, oranges and purples.
  • Binder with handwritten class notes, made in 1921/1922 by Charlotte Cummings while at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Page shows reading list, which includes the Bible, Anatol France, John Burroughs, Fabre, Huxley, Tyndall and Arnold Bennett.

1921/1922 Class Notebook

My parents are engaged in the slow process of cleaning out the home they’ve lived in the last 35 years. Recently, for example, they cleared papers out of an old secretary my grandmother used (my dad’s mother). Inside the desk were unused sheets of stationery and other things that had no real value. But they also stumbled upon something precious: my grandmother’s notebook from painting and drawing classes in 1921/1922. At the time, Charlotte was a student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.READ MORE

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June 4, 1944: “…it’s only hope that holds us together”

Front and back images of postcard written by French Forced Laborer Louis-Robert Fayet on June 4, 1944
Thorn, the 4th of June, 1944    Carte

My little adored Marie,

I see, my love, that you have received good news from Jeannot (Johnny). I’m happy about that, darling. Yes, I also wish for him to return soon, close to his little wife and his Nicole. Yes, Loulou, let’s hope that everything will be finished soon so that we can all stroll together.

READ MORE

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March 24, 1918: Letter written by Emery Porter who was “Nowhere in France”

This letter was written and mailed by my grandfather, J. Emery Porter, to his sister, Lois Bayley. Forty or so of Emery’s WWI letters to Lois have survived (read more about these letters here). On the back of the envelope (shown above), he included a return address: “Pvt. Emery Porter, 646 Aero Squadron, American Expeditionary Forces, via New York.” I never met my grandfather, but I heard he was a life-long French speaker and unabashed Francophile, primarily due to the experiences he had while stationed in France.

 

“Nowhere in France”
March 24, 1918

Dear Sister,

I was the happy recipient of your letter today. It is the second I have received from home folks. I received one from Mother two weeks ago this morning but nothing since. Evidently you have written others which I may yet receive. This one was dated March 2nd or 3rd. Emily K. has written six but I have received two so far so you can judge why I don’t respond often.

READ MORE

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“My father was friends with Marcel Heuzé”

Our conversation began with this astonishing claim: “My father was friends with Marcel Heuzé.”
(Cue the sound of a needle scratching across a record.)

Let me back up. Two weeks ago, I picked up my office phone to hear a 90-year-old woman with a crisp French accent state her name — Nelly Trocmé Hewett — followed by the astonishing claim her father had been friends with Marcel.READ MORE

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December 26, 1944: “Somewhere in France”

12/26/44
Somewhere in France

My Dearest Wife:

Well Christmas is here an gone. It didn’t even seem like Christmas just like another day. Christmas Eve we didn’t get in till about six. After we ate I washed and shaved. Was [illegible due to paper damage] to a little party they were having over in his Co. Then we were going to go to midnight services. READ MORE

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December 24, 1943: “I’ll say a prayer for the best little family in the world.”

24 December 1943

Dearest little Mother,

Just a short time ago we finished with morning (9 A.M.) sick call. I have had indications that today might be a very busy one so thought I’d better get off your daily letter early.

Tonight is Xmas eve and I can just see you hanging up a little pair of stockings by the chimney with care. What are you giving Mike for Xmas dear? Pretty hard to think of things for a little tyke like that isn’t it? Gosh I’d certainly like to be with you tonight. I will in spirit anyway, especially when I am in church tonight. I’ll say a prayer for the best little family in the world.READ MORE

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December 22, 1942: “I wish I could put into words what I have in my heart.”

Dec. 22, 1942

Dearest Wilma:

Received two letters of yours, today. One written the 23rd of November, the other a v-mail letter written the 31st of August, the new and the old.

Don’t you ever change the way you have been writing your sweet letters! I’ll admit they just about knock me off my feet, but it’s just what I want to hear. I wish I could put into words what I have in my heart and mind, but I am afraid I would make a mess of it. Perhaps you’ll remember some of [the] things I told you a long time ago. It all goes double, now.READ MORE

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Interview with Ann Marie Ackerman, author of Death of an Assassin

 

CP: Congratulations on the release of “Death of an Assassin: The True Story of the German Murderer Who Died Defending Robert E. Lee” (Sept 1. 2017, Kent State University Press). This fascinating story would have been entirely lost to time if you hadn’t put together these German and American puzzle pieces — congratulations! Tell us a bit about the mystery you solved:

AMA: Thank you, Carolyn! Actually, it was two mysteries, one on each continent.READ MORE

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February 15, 1945: “A card to you from not too gay Paree…”

February 15, 1945

My dear young men:

A card to you from not too gay Paree. But it is a beautiful city filled with beautiful women, beautiful buildings, beautiful stores, everything beautiful, no Frenchmen, and a lot of G.I. soldiers. I wish you both could be here to enjoy it. I wish I could enjoy it, too, but I am too busy with my work. Some other day, maybe 

— Dad

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